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Image:Bible de Douai - 1609.jpg|thumb|Douai bible - Old Testament (1609) The '''Douay–Rheims Bible''' (pronounced or ) (also known as the '''Rheims–Douai Bible''' or '''Douai Bible''', and abbreviated as '''D–R''' and '''DV''') is a translation of the Bible from the Latin Vulgate into English made by members of the English College, Douai, in the service of the Catholic Church.Pope, Hugh. [https://archive.org/stream/dublinreview147londuoft#page/96/mode/2up "The Origin of the Douay Bible,"] ''The Dublin Review'', Vol. CXLVII, N°. 294-295, July/October, 1910. The New Testament portion was published in Reims, France, in 1582, in one volume with extensive commentary and notes. The Old Testament portion was published in two volumes thirty years later by the University of Douai. The first volume, covering Book of Genesis|Genesis through Book of Job|Job, was published...
EditorJ. B. Sykes | encyclopedia = The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Current English | title = Douai | accessdate = 2011-07-18 | edition = Sixth edition 1976, Sixth impression 1978 | year = 1978 | publisher = Oxford University Press | location = Oxford | pages = 309}}) (also known as the '''Rheims–Douai Bible''' or '''Douai Bible''', and abbreviated as '''D–R''' and '''DV''') is a translation of the Bible from the Latin Vulgate into English made by members of the English College, Douai, in the service of the Catholic Church.Pope, Hugh. [https://archive.org/stream/dublinreview147londuoft#page/96/mode/2up "The Origin of the Douay Bible,"] ''The Dublin Review'', Vol. CXLVII, N°. 294-295, July/October, 1910. The New Testament portion was published in Reims, France, in 1582, in one volume with extensive commentary and notes. The Old Testament portion was published in two volumes thirty years later by the University of Douai. The first volume, covering Book of Genesis|Genesis through Book of Job|Job, was published in 1609; the second, covering Psalms to 2 Maccabees|2 Machabees plus the Biblical apocrypha|apocrypha of the Vulgate was published in 1610. Marginal notes took up the bulk of the volumes and had a strong Polemics|polemical and Patristics|patristic character. They offered insights on issues of translation, and on the Hebrew and Greek language|Greek source texts of the Vulgate.
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